Book Reviews

Left Brain, Right Stuff—How Leaders Make Winning Decisions, by Phil Rosenzweig (2014)

This book is more evidence that the best lessons from behavioral investing, ones that will change your own thinking and process, usually come from outside the echo chamber of financial markets.

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The Hour Between Dog and Wolf, by John Coates (2012)

Coates has succeeded in connecting the neuroscience with the behavioral / cognitive psychology that’s most relevant to investors.

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Medici Money—Banking, Metaphysics and Art in Fifteenth-Century Florence, by Tim Parks (2006)

The author repeatedly emphasizes that much of the world in which we live today—where one can be a banker and a moral person, where one can have decent moral values and be a secular person—was first laid out in 15th century Florence.

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The Party: The Secret World of China’s Communist Rulers, by Richard McGregor (2010)

In order to ‘play’ the China story, however, you need to understand its operating system and then analyze the economy within that framework. I would recommend this book as a starting point for that process.

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Keynes: the Return of the Master, by Robert Skidelsky (2010)

The Return of the Master is a great place to start to understand the far-reaching consequences of the ideas of an architect of many of the economic policies and institutions of our day.

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The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine,
by Michael Lewis (2010)

The Big Short is a quick and compelling read about the recent financial crisis. Whether you know nothing about it and want to learn or you’ve already read 25 books on this subject and are eager for another, I’d put this one on your list.

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